So, I went to Wakanda

Submitted by admin on Fri, 02/23/2018 - 20:01
Wakanda - Black Panther

 

Dear Friends,

So I went to Wakanda. At first glance, it was an impressive place even though I am allergic to monarchies, all monarchies. It was wondrous to find a country that had ducked under colonialism (don't scare me like that colonizer), that was able to develop according to its own laws, using its own resources for its social welfare. I was happy to find that the resources of Wakanda were being used to make medicines and to create public transport. The country's resources were not stripped to go to the colonizer, for the colonizer's benefit. I was happy to see an African country

Tricontinental Is On Social Media!

Submitted by admin on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 15:39
Tricontinental: Institute of Social Research

 

 

Dear Friends,

We are within sight of launching Tricontinental: Institute of Social Research, with offices in Buenos Aires, Johannesburg, New Delhi and Sao Paulo. On March 1, we'll have our website alive and ready to go. For now, we have our social media pages - at Facebook and on Twitter - alive and well. Please follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook. Also, visit our website to sign up for our materials (there is a silly little video there as well). As I mentioned earlier, this newsletter will slowly transition to become the weekly newsletter from the Tricontinental. It will have

The Unforgettable Poor

Submitted by admin on Sat, 02/10/2018 - 13:37
Prashad with Abahali baseMjondolo (People of the Shacks) movement in Durban

 

 

Dear Friends,


In 1969, the Honduran poet Roberto Sosa published a book called Los Pobres. The title poem is haunting. It opens,

The poor are many
and so—
impossible to forget.

The poor are also impossible to forget because they lead their struggles for emancipation from the injustice of our social order.

Last week, I spent a little time with Abahali baseMjondolo (People of the Shacks) movement based in Durban (South Africa). They gave me a full sense of their philosophy of 'living politics'. It allowed me to better understand their movement, which I had read about thanks to the work of

Reporting from Places of War and Routes of Refugees: from Syria to the Sahel

Description

 

Numsa presents a discussion with Vijay Prashad

Reporting from places of War and Routes of Refugees from Syria to the Sahel

Date: Tuesday 6 February 2018

Time: 18:00

Venue: VMCC, 155 Lilian Ngoyi St 155 Lilian Ngoyi St, Newtown, Johannesburg, 2113, South Africa

Contact: +27722368703

 

 

Tags

Focus on Zambia, Where Hunger Exists Besides Copper Wealth

Submitted by admin on Sat, 02/03/2018 - 02:36
Chellah Tukuta Rancen
Photo Chellah Tukuta Rancen

 

 

Dear Friends,

Greetings from Johannesburg.

Zambia is a country that is not often in the news. But it should be. It is a major source of copper for the world. Indeed, its copper is sluiced out by major multinational corporations based in Canada, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and China. What is extraordinary is that the children that grow up on the land above the copper mines suffer from an illiteracy rate of 60%. That is shameful. There needs to be scrutiny on these multinational corporations that have made it their business to drain the wealth out of Africa

A World of War

Submitted by admin on Wed, 01/24/2018 - 00:00
YPJ fighters Raqqa (February 2017)
YPJ fighters Raqqa (February 2017) CC BY 2.0

 

Dear Friends,

Turkey made the inevitable move into Syria with air strikes and artillery bombardment of Kurdish positions along the Turkish-Syrian border. Turkish and allied troops have entered Syria, moving towards the town of Afrin. The policy, which Turkey has made clear, is to remove Syrian Kurdish control over the land along the border which the Kurds call Rojava, or Western Kurdistan. The Kurds - organized as the YPG and the YPJ as well as the Syrian Democratic Forces - are well dug in with a network of tunnels and hardened bunkers to give

South African Metalworkers Mourn the Death of South Africa's Radical Trumpeter, Hugh Masekela - Bra Hugh

Submitted by Vijay Prashad on Tue, 01/23/2018 - 12:27
When he was 16 - Masekela

 

[The picture above was taken by Alf Khumalo, one of South Africa's most important photo journalists, of a 16 year old Masekala after he received a trumpet from Louis Armstrong. Below, Masekala and Miriam Makeba with Soweto Blues with a commentary from Makeba]

 

 

23 January 2018

NUMSA mourns the passing on of Bra Hugh Masekela

The leadership of the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA) and all its members and the working class in general, mourn the departure of Bra Hugh Masekela.

Our sincere and deepest condolences to his family, friends and indeed the music

Migrants Without Shoes

Submitted by admin on Thu, 01/18/2018 - 04:02
Looking at the photographs by Shahidul Alam - pictured above - in Dhaka last week

 

Dear Friends,

Looking at the photographs by Shahidul Alam - pictured above - in Dhaka last week reminded me of the migrants from Ethiopia who returned home from Saudi Arabia without shoes. His pictures were about Bangladeshi migrants in Malaysia, but the stories seemed to mirror those of Ethiopians in Saudi Arabia. These are people who remit more money to their home countries than the Foreign Direct Investment that goes into them, and yet while the FDI merchants are treated as saviors, the migrant workers are treated as criminals. There is no secret to why this is so. It is the

Shithole World

Submitted by admin on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 22:42
'Rohingya refugees who arrived from Myanmar to Shah Porir Dwip the previous night, on a boat headed to Bhanga in Teknaf, Cox's Bazar'  Shahidul Alam

 

Dear Friends,

Shithole? That is what US President Donald Trump is said to have called certain countries of the three continents of Africa, Asia and Latin America. This is familiar language. Former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger once called Bangladesh a 'basket case'.

It is well worth remembering that in 1757 Major General Robert Clive of the East India Company described Dhaka as 'as extensive, populous and rich as the city of London'. Before the Select Committee on East India (1840) Sir Charles Trevelyan said, 'The population of the town of Dacca has fallen from 150,000 to 30,000